Making Sense Of Weight Loss

Obesity is on the march. The numbers are undeniable.

– 127 million adults in the U.S. are overweight.

– 60 million obese.

– 9 million severely obese.

And it’s not just the United States. The rest of the world is keeping pace pound for pound. As a species, we are getting steadily fatter, day by day, year by year. This is not just a question of vanity. Along with weight gain comes the increased risk of chronic best keto supplements — best keto pills 2020 conditions such as diabetes and heart disease–not to mention all of those things you don’t even think about, such as an increased risk of injury on the job.

What are we to do?

The media reports on all kinds of studies designed to help. Not!

There are studies that rank the various diets ( Volumetrics is number one according to Consumer Reports) followed by studies that prove that no diet works. (Those studies say it’s healthier to just get slowly fatter and not diet at all.) And then there are the studies that say it’s not your fault because.

– It’s in your genes.

– It’s your intestinal bacteria.

– It’s a disease.

– It’s the natural state of things. It’s thin people who are abnormal. We should embrace the heavy body and accept who we are.

– It’s the result of exposure to toxins in your food and environment.

Of course, clothing manufacturers have a different approach. They just change the definition of sizes. Dress manufacturers have steadily modified sizing to fit larger women into smaller sized clothing. (Are you going to believe what you see in the mirror, or what it says on the label?) Heck, I recently bought a men’s medium t-shirt (I’ve always worn a medium), and I could set up house in this thing. It’s equivalent to the extra large size that I grew up with.

Reality check

First of all, enough is enough. Bad genes may have an impact for some, but they are hardly the primary, exclusive cause of weight gain. Obesity is not a disease. It’s certainly not normal. None of these things explains the worldwide explosion in obesity that we’ve seen over the last 30 years.
It’s a simple matter of consuming more calories than you expend day after day. Over the last 30 years, we have taken to eating more and more high calorie fast food and exercising less and less as we sit passively at desks, typing on keyboards, and talking on the phone. And even those of us who still work in manufacturing now do more controlling of heavy equipment by pressing buttons than actual physical labor.

As of 2000, the average American took in 300 more calories a day than was the case 15 years earlier. Doesn’t sound like much? That translates into one pound gained every eleven days, or 31 extra pounds of body weight…each and every year.

A Big Mac, medium Coke and large fries from McDonald’s contain a total of 1,340 calories, more than half the recommended daily calories for both men and women. (By the way, if that’s not enough for you, McDonald’s is now marketing the new, even bigger Third Pounder–for those who believe that too much is not enough.)

Then combine that with sedentary work, which by itself translates to an extra 45-65 pounds of weight every year.

The bottom line is that it’s calories “in” vs calories “out.” We’re taking in, on average, an extra 30 pounds of calories each and every year and burning up 45-65 pounds fewer of them. Is it any wonder we’re getting fatter? This is not genes. It’s not intestinal bacteria. It’s not a disease. It’s not who we are. Quite simply, it’s a self-inflicted disaster.

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